Indoor plants cooling effect

Indoor plants cooling effect



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Summertime may bring many wonderful things but the extreme heat is not one of them. For many, using air conditioning is not affordable nor available. Here are some tips for keeping your house cool in the summer heat, with or without AC. We use these techniques in steamy South Carolina to reduce our air conditioning bill.

Content:
  • Designing EXCLUSIVE INTERIORS
  • Summer Watering Schedule for Indoor Plants
  • Guide to Indoor Air Quality
  • Planting trees can cut urban air pollution by up to 24%
  • 5 ways to stay cool this summer
  • 10 Houseplants That Improve Your Indoor Air Quality
  • Introduce a house plant for a healthier home
  • Indoor plants also at your service
WATCH RELATED VIDEO: Plants to Keep Your House Naturally COOL

Designing EXCLUSIVE INTERIORS

Information provided in this safety guide is based on current scientific and technical understanding of the issues presented and is reflective of the jurisdictional boundaries established by the statutes governing the co-authoring agencies. Following the advice given will not necessarily provide complete protection in all situations or against all health hazards that may be caused by indoor air pollution.

All of us face a variety of risks to our health as we go about our day-to-day lives. Driving in cars, flying in planes, engaging in recreational activities, and being exposed to environmental pollutants all pose varying degrees of risk. Some risks are simply unavoidable. Some we choose to accept because to do otherwise would restrict our ability to lead our lives the way we want. And some are risks we might decide to avoid if we had the opportunity to make informed choices. Indoor air pollution is one risk that you can do something about.

In the last several years, a growing body of scientific evidence has indicated that the air within homes and other buildings can be more seriously polluted than the outdoor air in even the largest and most industrialized cities. Other research indicates that people spend approximately 90 percent of their time indoors. Thus, for many people, the risks to health may be greater due to exposure to air pollution indoors than outdoors.

In addition, people who may be exposed to indoor air pollutants for the longest periods of time are often those most susceptible to the effects of indoor air pollution. Such groups include the young, the elderly, and the chronically ill, especially those suffering from respiratory or cardiovascular disease. While pollutant levels from individual sources may not pose a significant health risk by themselves, most homes have more than one source that contributes to indoor air pollution.

There can be a serious risk from the cumulative effects of these sources. Fortunately, there are steps that most people can take both to reduce the risk from existing sources and to prevent new problems from occurring. This safety guide was prepared by the U. Consumer Product Safety Commission CPSC to help you decide whether to take actions that can reduce the level of indoor air pollution in your own home.

Because so many Americans spend a lot of time in offices with mechanical heating, cooling, and ventilation systems, there is also a short section on the causes of poor air quality in offices and what you can do if you suspect that your office may have a problem.

A glossary and a list of organizations where you can get additional information are available in this document. Indoor pollution sources that release gases or particles into the air are the primary cause of indoor air quality problems in homes. Inadequate ventilation can increase indoor pollutant levels by not bringing in enough outdoor air to dilute emissions from indoor sources and by not carrying indoor air pollutants out of the home.

High temperature and humidity levels can also increase concentrations of some pollutants. There are many sources of indoor air pollution in any home. These include combustion sources such as oil, gas, kerosene, coal, wood, and tobacco products; building materials and furnishings as diverse as deteriorated, asbestos-containing insulation, wet or damp carpet, and cabinetry or furniture made of certain pressed wood products; products for household cleaning and maintenance, personal care, or hobbies; central heating and cooling systems and humidification devices; and outdoor sources such as radon, pesticides, and outdoor air pollution.

The relative importance of any single source depends on how much of a given pollutant it emits and how hazardous those emissions are. In some cases, factors such as how old the source is and whether it is properly maintained are significant.

For example, an improperly adjusted gas stove can emit significantly more carbon monoxide than one that is properly adjusted. Some sources, such as building materials, furnishings, and household products like air fresheners, release pollutants more or less continuously. Other sources, related to activities carried out in the home, release pollutants intermittently. These include smoking, the use of unvented or malfunction-ing stoves, furnaces, or space heaters, the use of solvents in cleaning and hobby activities, the use of paint strippers in redecorating activities, and the use of cleaning products and pesticides in housekeeping.

High pollutant concentrations can remain in the air for long periods after some of these activities. If too little outdoor air enters a home, pollutants can accumulate to levels that can pose health and comfort problems. Unless they are built with special mechanical means of ventilation, homes that are designed and constructed to minimize the amount of outdoor air that can "leak" into and out of the home may have higher pollutant levels than other homes.

However, because some weather conditions can drastically reduce the amount of outdoor air that enters a home, pollutants can build up even in homes that are normally considered "leaky.

Outdoor air enters and leaves a house by: infiltration, natural ventilation, and mechanical ventilation. In a process known as infiltration, outdoor air flows into the house through openings, joints, and cracks in walls, floors, and ceilings, and around windows and doors. In natural ventilation, air moves through opened windows and doors. Air movement associated with infiltration and natural ventilation is caused by air temperature differences between indoors and outdoors and by wind.

Finally, there are a number of mechanical ventilation devices, from outdoor-vented fans that intermittently remove air from a single room, such as bathrooms and kitchen, to air handling systems that use fans and duct work to continuously remove indoor air and distribute filtered and conditioned outdoor air to strategic points throughout the house.

The rate at which outdoor air replaces indoor air is described as the air exchange rate. When there is little infiltration, natural ventilation, or mechanical ventilation, the air exchange rate is low and pollutant levels can increase.

Apartments can have the same indoor air problems as single-family homes because many of the pollution sources, such as the interior building materials, furnishings, and household products, are similar. Indoor air problems similar to those in offices are caused by such sources as contaminated ventilation systems, improperly placed outdoor air intakes, or maintenance activities. Solutions to air quality problems in apartments, as in homes and offices, involve such actions as: eliminating or controlling the sources of pollution, increasing ventilation, and installing air cleaning devices.

Often a resident can take the appropriate action to improve the indoor air quality by removing a source, altering an activity, unblocking an air supply vent, or opening a window to temporarily increase the ventilation; in other cases, however, only the building owner or manager is in a position to remedy the problem.

Box , Pittsburgh, PA , or call , faxHealth effects from indoor air pollutants may be experienced soon after exposure or, possibly, years later. Immediate effects may show up after a single exposure or repeated exposures. These include irritation of the eyes, nose, and throat, headaches, dizziness, and fatigue. Such immediate effects are usually short-term and treatable.

Sometimes the treatment is simply eliminating the person's exposure to the source of the pollution, if it can be identified. Symptoms of some diseases, including asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and humidifier fever, may also show up soon after exposure to some indoor air pollutants.

The likelihood of immediate reactions to indoor air pollutants depends on several factors. Age and preexisting medical conditions are two important influences. In other cases, whether a person reacts to a pollutant depends on individual sensitivity, which varies tremendously from person to person. Some people can become sensitized to biological pollutants after repeated exposures, and it appears that some people can become sensitized to chemical pollutants as well.

Certain immediate effects are similar to those from colds or other viral diseases, so it is often difficult to determine if the symptoms are a result of exposure to indoor air pollution. For this reason, it is important to pay attention to the time and place the symptoms occur. If the symptoms fade or go away when a person is away from the home and return when the person returns, an effort should be made to identify indoor air sources that may be possible causes. Some effects may be made worse by an inadequate supply of outdoor air or from the heating, cooling, or humidity conditions prevalent in the home.

Other health effects may show up either years after exposure has occurred or only after long or repeated periods of exposure. These effects, which include some respiratory diseases, heart disease, and cancer, can be severely debilitating or fatal. It is prudent to try to improve the indoor air quality in your home even if symptoms are not noticeable. More information on potential health effects from particular indoor air pollutants is provided in the section, "A Look at Source-Specific Controls.

While pollutants commonly found in indoor air are responsible for many harmful effects, there is considerable uncertainty about what concentrations or periods of exposure are necessary to produce specific health problems. People also react very differently to exposure to indoor air pollutants. Further research is needed to better understand which health effects occur after exposure to the average pollutant concentrations found in homes and which occur from the higher concentrations that occur for short periods of time.

The health effects associated with some indoor air pollutants are summarized in the section "Reference Guide to Major Indoor Air Pollutants in the Home. Some health effects can be useful indicators of an indoor air quality problem, especially if they appear after a person moves to a new residence, remodels or refurnishes a home, or treats a home with pesticides. If you think that you have symptoms that may be related to your home environment, discuss them with your doctor or your local health department to see if they could be caused by indoor air pollution.

You may also want to consult a board-certified allergist or an occupational medicine specialist for answers to your questions. Another way to judge whether your home has or could develop indoor air problems is to identify potential sources of indoor air pollution. Although the presence of such sources does not necessarily mean that you have an indoor air quality problem, being aware of the type and number of potential sources is an important step toward assessing the air quality in your home.

A third way to decide whether your home may have poor indoor air quality is to look at your lifestyle and activities. Human activities can be significant sources of indoor air pollution. Finally, look for signs of problems with the ventilation in your home. Signs that can indicate your home may not have enough ventilation include moisture condensation on windows or walls, smelly or stuffy air, dirty central heating and air cooling equipment, and areas where books, shoes, or other items become moldy.

To detect odors in your home, step outside for a few minutes, and then upon reentering your home, note whether odors are noticeable. The federal government recommends that you measure the level of radon in your home. Without measurements there is no way to tell whether radon is present because it is a colorless, odorless, radioactive gas. Inexpensive devices are available for measuring radon.

EPA provides guidance as to risks associated with different levels of exposure and when the public should consider corrective action. There are specific mitigation techniques that have proven effective in reducing levels of radon in the home.

See "Radon" for additional information about testing and controlling radon in homes. For pollutants other than radon, measurements are most appropriate when there are either health symptoms or signs of poor ventilation and specific sources or pollutants have been identified as possible causes of indoor air quality problems. Testing for many pollutants can be expensive.

Before monitoring your home for pollutants besides radon, consult your state or local health department or professionals who have experience in solving indoor air quality problems in nonindustrial buildings. The federal government recommends that homes be weatherized in order to reduce the amount of energy needed for heating and cooling.

While weatherization is underway, however, steps should also be taken to minimize pollution from sources inside the home. In addition, residents should be alert to the emergence of signs of inadequate ventilation, such as stuffy air, moisture condensation on cold surfaces, or mold and mildew growth. Additional weatherization measures should not be undertaken until these problems have been corrected.

Weatherization generally does not cause indoor air problems by adding new pollutants to the air. There are a few exceptions, such as caulking, that can sometimes emit pollutants. However, measures such as installing storm windows, weather stripping, caulking, and blown-in wall insulation can reduce the amount of outdoor air infiltrating into a home.

Consequently, after weatherization, concentrations of indoor air pollutants from sources inside the home can increase. Usually the most effective way to improve indoor air quality is to eliminate individual sources of pollution or to reduce their emissions. Some sources, like those that contain asbestos, can be sealed or enclosed; others, like gas stoves, can be adjusted to decrease the amount of emissions.

In many cases, source control is also a more cost-efficient approach to protecting indoor air quality than increasing ventilation because increasing ventilation can increase energy costs.


Summer Watering Schedule for Indoor Plants

There are indoor plants, which most of the people keep in their house for decoration purpose as well as they are good for giving cooling effect in your house. Research has shown that plant can help you breathe happier and boost your mood just by having them around. Once you learn plant care basics and find a routine, you will notice the benefits of being a plant parent. Here we look at tips and tricks on how to take care of your indoor plants. For potted plants, you have to ensure when to water the plant. Also, check leaves. If they are discoloured water them.

Taun talks about fertilizer you can use on house plants in this heat. Taun goes into the cooling effects of trees and grass.

Guide to Indoor Air Quality

Indoor plants not only look help but also the air to clean fantastic. Indoor plants reduce unhealthy pollutants and airborne bacteria, fungi while adding the humidity needed to combat respiratory and allergic conditions.. Many pollutants are chemical compounds that are released into the air through a process called "off-gassing". It is often difficult to completely control the indoor climate in an office or home. Indoor environment Plants have been proven to remove airborne harmful contaminants. Most people spend the majority of time indoors at home or work. Air conditioning, improved insulation, and energy-saving all reduce air exchange in buildings, so we breathe the same air again and again. Because the modern internal environment is virtually hermetically sealed and the construction materials used, modern synthetic furnishings, computers, electrical equipment, and everyday household products such as cleaning material, can produce harmful substances that are trapped inside the building. These all contribute to the well recognized "sick building syndrome".

Planting trees can cut urban air pollution by up to 24%

Information provided in this safety guide is based on current scientific and technical understanding of the issues presented and is reflective of the jurisdictional boundaries established by the statutes governing the co-authoring agencies. Following the advice given will not necessarily provide complete protection in all situations or against all health hazards that may be caused by indoor air pollution. All of us face a variety of risks to our health as we go about our day-to-day lives. Driving in cars, flying in planes, engaging in recreational activities, and being exposed to environmental pollutants all pose varying degrees of risk.

Read Before Use. Growth is expected to be driven by rising concerns among consumers regarding their health and skin problems, predominantly due to hectic and stressful lifestyles, which is resulting in a shift in consumer preference towards natural alternatives and herbal nutraceuticals.

5 ways to stay cool this summer

During the hot months of summer, it is not uncommon to want to turn on a fan to help cool down your house. However, if you have indoor plants that are blowing around because of the fan, you may want to know if this is harming them. Fans are not hurting your indoor plants as long as they are not too close to or directly positioned towards the plant. In turn, the fan can actually benefit the growth of the plant by improving air circulation and ventilation and keep the plant growing healthy and strong. Since air is one of the main factors that can impact the health of a plant, keeping fresh air moving smoothly throughout your room or house will benefit your indoor plant.

10 Houseplants That Improve Your Indoor Air Quality

Indoor plants beautify the indoor space, and create a more naturalistic element to sterile looking spaces. Well, indoor plants do more than just beautifying the indoor space. Plants in the workplace do not only offer an aesthetic value, but studies have shown that they help in reducing stress, enhance employees attitudes, increase productivity, and also improve the air quality. On the other hand, having indoor plants in your home adds color, texture and great warmth to the house. They also allow you an all year round access to simple gardening and improves the air quality. Let's take a close look at the importance of plants and how they create a healthy environment on people's living and working spaces:. Productivity is generally improved in environments were indoor plants are present. Focus, concentration, and cognitive task are all much more improved, thus increasing the workforce productivity.

is the affect that passive cooling and heating can have on the etc. the plants can serve as a wind break protecting the house from.

Introduce a house plant for a healthier home

To help us give you the best experience possible, please accept all cookies. Customise cookies. Recently, academic and mainstream publications have reported that, despite widespread belief of the contrary, single potted plants alone are unable to remove enough pollutants to improve indoor air quality.

Indoor plants also at your service

RELATED VIDEO: TRENDING INDOOR PLANTS (Cooling Effect)

But what is comfortable for you can be very uncomfortable—or even deadly—for your houseplants. First, think about what plants need to grow and flourish. What are the optimal growing conditions in a greenhouse? So if you want plants, it sounds like you have to shut of the air conditioner and create your own indoor jungle, right?

RTS Recyclebank partners with cities and brands to reward residents for helping to make their communities cleaner, greener places.

As a freelancer, business owner or employee, when you think of the office environment, what is the first thing that comes to mind? But years of research, including a study at a Bank of America location in Manhattan, have shown that plants in the workplace offer an enormous amount of benefits besides being aesthetically pleasing. With Hiveage you can send elegant invoices to your customers, accept online payments, and manage your team — all in one place. As you may recall from your high school biology class, plants clean the air by taking in carbon dioxide and other pollutants and releasing oxygen through a process called photosynthesis. In the s, environmental scientist Dr. Bill Wolverton worked with the U.

There are a many beneficial things we can get from house plants or most indoor plants. Aside from beautifying our homes, most plants are eco-friendly, which means they provide a natural cooling effect and also they can be an air cleanser that rotates inside the house. We know that all plants basic need in order to be healthy, is to water them regularly and make sure they get enough light from the sun.